Madison College Meeting Targets for South
Campus Construction
Final Quarter Lap
Dr. Jack Daniels III at the August 28, 2017 press
conference announcing the plan for the creation
of a Madison College South campus at the Wisconsin
Employee Trust Fund building
liberal arts. We’re going to have our entrepreneur center. We’re going to have extended STEM programming in addition to the computer,
technology and science programs. We’ll also have wrap-around student services. It’s going to be a comprehensive campus.”

Over the past year — and particularly
since August — Daniels and his staff have been laying the human and financial foundation for the new
facility.


“We’ve been talking to neighborhood
councils, business partners, faith-based communities and advisory committee members,” Daniels said.
“We will
have a full court press starting after the holidays. We’ve done a public phase to the extent that every time if I am meeting with a group,
I’m actually talking
about the South Madison Initiative and how folks can get involved. After the New Year, we will do a lot more in terms of
community. We’ll do some ‘friendraising’
to raise some additional funds. We will then continue with corporations and businesses and
individuals. We have a plan of action.”

So far, the college has been hitting its donation targets for the completion of Phase Three of the project. It must raise $3.5 million by March 31,
2018 to qualify for a $3.5 million gift from Great Lakes Higher Ed Corp.

“By the end of the week, we would have reached our goal for what we had set to raise before the holidays,” Daniels said. “We raised $1 million
and we are extremely close to that right now. We received $100,000 from J.H. Findorff & Sons this afternoon. The Rennebohm Foundation gave
$250,000. We received another $500,000 that we will be able to report on later and there are a couple of small ones that will boost us up.”

Daniels emphasized that while the major gifts have come from corporations and foundations, it is important that the community have a sense of
ownership of the facility.

“To get ownership, folks within our community could give a dollar,” Daniels said. “They could give $5 or $500,000. But for the community
members, if they can do that in whatever amount, that gives them that ownership within the facility. We are going to acknowledge permanently
anyone who gives regardless of what level they are giving. And we are going to do that within the South Madison campus building. Some of the
gifts have the potential for naming opportunities. There is the potential for people to bundle their gifts together to secure naming rights. We have
certain rules internally in terms of naming opportunities. If they can put together something and they want to name something a particular way,
that is something that we want to consider.”

By contributing, people can make the Madison College South campus a truly community college.

For more information about the project or to make a donation, visit
www.supportmadisoncollege.org. Hit ‘Read More’ in the section about the
Madison South Initiative. All donations are tax deductible.
By Jonathan Gramling

Madison College is in the final quarter year lap to complete its roughly $21 million
capital campaign to purchase the Wisconsin Employee Trust Fund building at the
corner of S. Park Street and Badger Road, demolish it and build a 75,000 sq. ft.
facility that would be ready to open for the fall 2019 academic year. Everything has
been going according to plan.

“We’ve gone through the processes with the regulatory agencies, city
commissions,
urban planning, all of these things,” said Dr. Jack Daniels III, Madison College
president. “We’ve gone through WTCS for first phase and they said, ‘Go.’ We will
come back to them a second time when we have everything done including the
purchase.”

The purchase is planned for April with the demolition and ground breaking
scheduled for June 2018. What will take the ETF building’s place will be a state-of-
the-art educational facility.

“We will have four science labs, three computer labs and a number of
classrooms,” Daniels said. “The multipurpose rooms can be used by the
community for meetings and events. We’ll have early childhood classes and