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EDITORIAL STAFF

Publisher & Editor
Jonathan Gramling

Staff Reporter
Hedi Rudd

Contributing Writers
Sujhey Beisser, Fabu, Nichelle Nichols,
John Y. Odom, Donna Parker, Heidi
Pascual, Angela Puerta, Jamala Rogers,
Kwame Salter, Angelica Euseary, Wayne
Strong, Kipp Thomas, and Nia Trammell

Webmaster
Heidi M. Pascual
Vol. 15    No. 15
JULY 27, 2020
Good Trouble
Email
gramling@capitalcityhues.com
to Advertise
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In honor of the late and great Congressman John Lewis, I have
named this column Good Trouble. Throughout his personal,
professional and political career, Lewis urged people to make good
trouble, that is civil disobedience and other forms of non-violent —
meaning physically and emotionally — that would inevitable cause
ripples through the system and the present state of affairs.

It was the sit-ins in places like Nashville, Tennessee, Greenville,
North Carolina and Atlanta, Georgia that brought about the
desegregation of many public accommodations, especially those
under the purview of the federal government. Sitting at the lunch
counters was against the law if you were African American. And
sitting at those lunch counters caused people like John Lewis to be
arrested. It caused problems for the system, results that Lewis
called “good trouble.’

It was the Selma to Montgomery March that defied the orders of local
and state authorities in Alabama and caused a police riot. Many
people were severely injured and arrested, Lewis among them. This
was good — if not painful — trouble. And the Selma to Montgomery
March — the third iteration — led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965,
which in turn led to the election of hundreds of African Americans to
local, state and national offices.

And while there have been many protests of late making “good
trouble” to make sure that the Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t
fade away without meaningful change happening, there is another
form of “good trouble” that people need to engage in on August 11th
and November 3rd. It is the act of voting, one of the most
revolutionary things you can do in combination with like-minded
citizens.
-- READ MORE
Columns & Features
Editor's Corner
Reflections
by Jonathan Gramling
CENTERSPREAD
Focused Business Development
BACKPAGE
Seeing the Big
Environmental Picture
Asian
Wisconzine
by Heidi M. Pascual
The Naked
Truth
by Jamala Rogers
The Naked
Truth
by Jamala Rogers
By Angelica Euseary
Playing the
Race Card
By Kwame Salter
The Missing Piece
By Eileen Hocker
FEATURE

This Isn’t Just
About SROs
By Stephen Colison
(Part 1 of 2)
By Payton Wade