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Jonathan Gramling

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Hedi Rudd

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Sujhey Beisser, Fabu, Nichelle Nichols,
John Y. Odom, Donna Parker, Heidi
Pascual, Angela Puerta, Jamala Rogers,
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COLUMNS & FEATURES
Vol. 14    No. 9
MAY 6, 2019
       Remembering Virginia and Eyvonne
223,877
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BEAMing with Excellence
CENTERSPREAD
BACKPAGE
OBITUARY

DR. VIRGINIA
HENDERSON
Asian
Wisconzine
by Heidi M. Pascual
The Naked
Truth
by Jamala Rogers
Virginia Henderson and Eyvonne
Crawford-Gray
One of the hard things about getting old is that you witness the
pillars of your life come down one by one, leaving an uncertain
landscape once the dust has cleared. When we are young, our
lives are given comfort and support by the people whom we
have in our lives, no matter how superficial or deep. All of these
people form an environment within which we operate. They add a
sense of reassurance that the sky will not fall today, that one is
not alone in the pursuit of some great passion like social justice.

I have had many of those pillars in my life pulled down, people
like Betty Franklin-Hammonds, Rev. J.C. Wright, Ilda Thomas,
Gene Parks, Paul Kusuda and so many others. Their passing
leaves a certain bareness to life, a vacuum that never quite gets
filled.

And now two more pillars have come tumbling down, Virginia
Henderson and Eyvonne Crawford-Gray. They always seem to
come down in twos and threes.

The first time I recall meeting Virginia was back in the early
1990s. Betty Franklin-Hammonds and her social work interns had
published two reports on the achievement gap of African
American students. I think the first year the report was published,
MMSD received it and was content to let it sit on a shelf
somewhere. --
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