Vol. 13   No. 11
MAY 28, 2018
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Editor's Corner
Reflections
by Jonathan Gramling
            
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EDITORIAL STAFF

Jonathan Gramling
Publisher & Editor

Staff Reporter
Hedi Rudd

Contributing Writers
Lisa Peyton-Caire, Sujhey Beisser, Wayne
Strong, Fabu, Kwame Salter, Heidi Pascual, Nia
Trammell, Nichelle Nichols, Jamala Rogers,
Kipp Thomas, and Donna Parker

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Heidi M. Pascual

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Madison, WI 53725
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CENTERSPREAD
The Capital City Hues' Annual Graduation Celebration
BACKPAGE
Shelia Stubbs Running for 77th
Wisconsin Assembly Seat
Running for Community
(Part 2 of 2)
By Jonathan Gramling
The Naked
Truth
by Jamala Rogers
Asian
Wisconzine
by Heidi M. Pascual
Poetic
Tongues
by Fabu
SPECIAL FEATURE OF THE YEAR
                                                                        The Struggle for Excellence
I have to admit that I am partial to Hollywood films about newspapers or whose major characters are newspaper people. Probably my most
favorite of the genre is True Crime starring Clint Eastwood who is given the job of doing a feature piece on a man who is scheduled to be
executed that night. And as Eastwood’s character reviews the background for the story and talks to some of the witnesses, he comes to
believe that the man is innocent and races against the clock to prove the man’s innocence in spite of the fact that everyone believes the
man is guilty and won’t lift a finger to help him.

And so Eastwood is totally focused on the story in spite of the fact that he has gotten fired from the newspaper because he didn’t just do a
feature piece. His wife is leaving him because of his focus and his womanizing. His car is breaking down as he races to the publisher’s
house late at night with a witness who can prove the man’s innocence. In short, the man’s whole life is crumbling around him as he stays
focused on the story.

And he does get the execution stayed and he writes a possible Pulitzer Prize story and the man is freed. But Eastwood’s life doesn’t come
back together after the man is set free. And in the final scene, Eastwood and the man with his family see each other from across an outdoor
mall. And they look for a while and then nod. The man goes off with his family. And Eastwood says, ‘And the cheese stands alone.’

I especially relate to that movie at this time of year. For about six weeks, I put my own life on hold to produce this Graduation issue.--MORE